The Saint Chapelle

Location

Paris, France


Address
8, boulevard du Palais
75001 Paris


Telephone

+33 1 53 40 60 80


Getting there

Metro: Cité


More information

www.sainte-chapelle.fr/en


Opening hours

From1st July to 31st August

Monday - Tuesday - Thursday - Friday - Saturday - Sunday 9.30-18.00 Wednesday 9.30-12.45 /14.15-21.30

From 1st Nov to 31st Dec

Monday - Tuesday - Wednesday - Thursday - Friday 9.00-13.00/ 14.15-17.00 Saturday - Sunday 9.00-17.00


La Conciergerie

Location

Paris, France


Address
2, boulevard du Palais
75001 Paris

Telephone

+33 1 53 40 60 80


Getting there

Metro: Cité


More information

www.paris-conciergerie.fr/en/


Opening hours

From 1st January to 31st December Every day 9.30-18.00


Prices

It is advisable to purchase combined thicket for La Conciergerie and Saint-Chapelle

Full price : 13,50 €
Reduced price : 10,50 €
Group price : 10,50 € 
No-queuing at the Conciergerie.

 

La Consiergerie

The Conciergerie (La Conciergerie) is a former royal palace and prison in Paris. During the French Revolution nearly 2,600 hundreds of prisoners, were taken from La Conciergerie to be executed on the Guillotine. 

It housed the Revolutionary Tribunal as well as up to 1,200 male and female prisoners at a time. Its rules were simple. Only two outcomes existed — a declaration of innocence or a death sentence — and in most cases the latter was chosen.

The most famous prisoner was the Queen Marie Antoinette.Her cell was converted into a chapel dedicated to her memory. When the Queen was here the present room was only about half its size, having a partition across it, behind which two soldiers were continually on guard, day and night. The Queen was kept here, from September 11th, 1793, until October 16th. Her chair, in which she sat most of the time, faced the window of the courtyard.

A few acts of kindness reached her in spite of the vigilance of the authorities. "The Queen had no complaint to make against the concierges Richard nor their successors the Baults. It is told that one day, about the end of August, Richard asked a fruit seller in the neighborhood to select him the best of her melons, whatever it might cost. `It is for a very important personage then ?' said the seller disdainfully, looking at the concierge's threadbare clothes. `Yes,' said he, `it is for someone who was once very important; she is so no longer; it is for the Queen.' `The Queen,' exclaimed the tradeswoman, turning over all her melons, ` the Queen ! Oh, poor woman ! Here, make her eat that, and I won't have you pay for it.

For her trial the Queen was taken to the Tribunal sitting in what is now the First Circle Chamber of the Palais de Justice, and led back in the evening to her cell. She was condemned to death on the fifteenth and died on the guillotine.

Marie Antoinette

Marie Antoinette (1755-1793) was born into Austrian royalty, the youngest daughter of Emperor Francis I and Maria Theresa. As a young teen, she married the grandson of Louis XV, and became Queen of France at the age of nineteen. As Queen, however, Marie Antoinette was extravagant, frivolous, and widely criticized by the people.

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Saint Chapelle - The Upstairs Downstairs Chapel

The Sainte-Chapelle was built to house precious relics: Christ's crown of thorns, the Image of Edessa and thirty other relics of Christ that had been in the possession of Louis IX since 1239.  He was passionate about relics and purchased them from the Latin emperor at Constantinople, Baldwin II, for the exorbitant sum of 135,000 livres. The entire chapel cost much less to build, only 40,000 livres.

Just as the Emperor could pass privately from his palace into Hagia Sophia in Constantinople, so now Louis could pass directly from his palace into the Sainte Chapelle. In the upper chapel near the forth window from the left is the secret entrance for the king.

 

The most beautiful part of the chapel are its stained glass windows framed by a delicate stonework. 

The chapel suffered its worst destruction during the French Revolution and much of the chapel as it appears today is a recreation, although nearly two-thirds of the windows are authentic.The Sainte Chapelle has been a national historic monument since 1862.

Saint Chapelle and La Conciergerie